Is Troy real?

 

 

I did NOT know Troy was in Turkey. There, I said it.

 

 

The remains of the ancient Troy can now be found 30 kilometers away from Çanakkale city in Turkey. The location of Troy (Truva in Turkish) is at the southern entrance of the Dardanelles (a beautiful strait that connects the Aegean Sea with the sea of Marmara).

 

We took a one day trip to Troy through Çanakkale which included: discovering the ancient ruins of Troy, two Trojan horses, a Naval Museum, two ferryboat rides, lots of Turkish flags, one Turkish Memorial Day and lots of sunshine.

 

The ruins of ancient Troy in Turkey

The first excavations were done in 1870 by the (in)famous Heinrich Schliemann. He was considered a hunter of archaeological treasures which he removed from the country (a lot of pieces from the excavations are now exhibited in Berlin and in museums across the world).

 

The archaeological techniques he used were under developing in. During the excavations, they unintentionally managed to destroy a lot of important discoveries.

 

Troy rocks 🙂

Basically, all you can find now in Troy are ruins. Yet, somehow, this place still rocks (get it? 🙂 ).

 

We managed to get lost among the ruins for two hours. It’s a magical place, although it is not as spectacular as other Greek and Roman archaeological sites around Turkey.

 

But thanks to Homer’s imagination (or is it?) I tend to believe that this place was once populated by beautiful Helens of Troy and Achilleses and treasures of King Priam’s. Sorry, I’m a helpless romantic 🙂

 

 

Layers of Troy

24 excavation campaigns and 140 years later we can say that Troy is of immense significance when it comes to understanding the development of European civilization. The Archaeological site of Troy bears witness to civilizations that occupied it for more than 4,000 years.

 

It is one of the most famous archaeological sites in the world, featured also on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

 

Oh, did I mention there is a huge wooden Trojan horse near the entrance to archaeological site? And of course, you can climb in it. I’ve been a Greek warrior for one entire minute! (I’m afraid of heights 🙂 )

 

 

Wooden horse in Troy

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